From the actual brake pedal to hydraulic brake fluid, our automotive technicians know every part of the brake system and can perform brake repair and maintenance on just about any make and model.

While your vehicle’s brake system has one job (to stop your vehicle), it still requires multiple components to work properly in order to get the job done.

How do I know if my brakes require maintenance?

  • If you hear squealing, it could be your brake pads vibrating or the spring clips losing tension. Your pads most likely need to be replaced.
  • Squeaking & Grinding noises are a clear indication of excessive wear or damage to your pads and rotors. The grinding is likely the metal backing of your brake pad contacting your rotor because the brake pad has been completely worn away.
  • If your vehicle has begun to pull to one side, your pads may need replacing.
  • If you notice your brake pedal pushing down too close to the floor of the vehicle, it is likely the brake pads have deteriorated and maintenance will be required.

Our Services

  • Brake pad replacement
  • Brake rotors/disk replacement
  • Shoe replacement
  • Parking brake cable replacement
  • Master cylinder replacement

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Components of Your Brake System

Disc Brakes

Disc Brakes are built with a disc or rotor, caliper assembly, brake pads and all the bearings/additional hardware that installs the components onto the vehicle.  The caliper is connected to the master cylinder through tubes and valves that push the brake fluid throughout your vehicle’s system.

  1. Rotor: Disc attached to wheel, roughly shaped like a flat-bottomed bowl with a wide lip at the top.
  2. Caliper: The brake caliper is where your car’s brake pads and pistons are located. The brake calipers slow your vehicle’s wheels by creating friction with the brake rotors.
  3. Brake Pad: A thin piece of material that presses against a vehicle’s brake rotor which in turn allows the vehicle to stop.

Brake Fluid:

Brake fluid is a type of hydraulic fluid that is used to transfer force under pressure (brake pedal) from where it is created through hydraulic lines to your brake system near the wheels. Brake fluid is also designed to protect against corrosion of the system materials it contacts, however those corrosion inhibitors deplete over time, and which is why many manufacturers recommend changing your brake fluid every 2 years.